Sofya Kovalevskaya

(Text by David Hokken) Last month, we saw that Florence Nightingale supported the allied forces in the Crimean War (1853-1856) as a statistician and nurse. She was not the only great female mathematician affected by this war. On the other side of the battlefield fought General Korvin-Krukovsky. The general had …

Meet the committee: the treasurer

The organisation of a big event like the EGMO 2020 is not free unfortunately. The treasurer makes sure that everybody gets paid: for example the hotel, the companies involved with the excursions and the volunteers that have made costs for the EGMO. On the other hand, the treasurer collects the …

Ruth Curtain (July 16, 1941 – March 18, 2018)

(This post is a translation by Dédé de Haan of the article “Als enige vrouw in de wiskunde val je wel op”, written by Ellen de Bruin. The original text, in Dutch, belongs to NRC Media and was published on August 25, 2015 on nrc.nl (https://www.nrc.nl/nieuws/2015/08/15/als-enige-vrouw-in-de-wiskunde-val-je-wel-op-1523725-a657945). The  NRC-article has been …

Maria Gaetana Agnesi

(Text by Danny Beckers) Maria Gaetana Agnesi (born in Milan, May 16, 1718 – died in Milan, January 9, 1799), famous for her textbook on calculus and her contributions to the discussions in the Milanese salon of her father. Daughter of Pietro Agnesi (1690?-1752), a very wealthy Milanese silk merchant, …

Florence Nightingale, part 2

(Text by Jenneke Krüger) Florence Nightingale was very conscientious in collecting numerical data. Even in the harsh conditions during the Crimean War, she meticulously noted number of patients, causes of deaths and death rates. Data which she used later on to create, with Farr, the famous ‘coxcomb’ diagrams (see Figure …

Karen Uhlenbeck, part 2

(Text by Jenneke Krüger) The BBC named Karen ‘the bubble maths researcher’. There are two main reasons for this. Firstly, Uhlenbeck studied a special kind of surfaces and discovered that, when zooming in on these surfaces, the mathematical equivalent to tiny bubbles appeared –therefore Uhlenbeck named this technique ‘bubbling’. In …

Karen Uhlenbeck

(Text by Jenneke Krüger) Karen Uhlenbeck (1942, Cleveland, Ohio, USA) is the eldest of four children; her mother, Carolyn Windeler Keskulla, was an artist and schoolteacher and her father, Arnold Keskulla, was an engineer. The family lived in a rural community; Karen liked (and likes) to spend time outdoors, but …